Food on Film – Proof That Meals Bring Us Together

Description: ttp://www.hardwoodparoxysm.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/my_dinner_with_andre.jpg

The other day I was thinking about My Dinner with Andre.

Released in 1981 and directed by Louis Malle, My Dinner with Andre showcases an elaborate conversation between playwright Wallace Shawn and theater director Andre Gregory.

In fact, that’s the whole movie – conversations and food.

Reflecting on the film in 1999, Roger Ebert wrote, “It should be unwatchable, and yet those who love it return time and again, enchanted.”

There could be a thousand different interpretations of this film. What does it mean? What is it about? There is no easy answer.

So, the other day when I was thinking about My Dinner with Andre, it dawned on me that when people come together, food is often at the center.

This isn’t news. Most people know that. We all understand the significance of mealtime gatherings.

Food is more than nutrition. It acts as an adhesive. Around food, people tell stories and share their experiences.

In short, food is where we connect with one another.

It brings to mind another cinematic moment– Woody Allen and Diane Keaton joyfully preparing lobsters in the kitchen during the 1977 film Annie Hall.

What is Annie Hall without those lobsters?

What is My Dinner with Andre without that dinner?

With your support, the St. Louis Area Foodbank attempts to put food on every table in the community. It may not be lobster or a four-course dinner, but we prioritize the acquisition of nutritious product that will help our neighbors in need.

I like to think that when we help put food on the table, we’re helping these families create their own movie moments.

 

Patrick_D
Patrick Delhougne is the development associate at the St. Louis Area Foodbank.

Share

Related Articles

Share the Holidays

The dichotomy that exists around the holidays is one that has baffled me for years. How can a season that is based around love, hope and joy be so stressful

Read More