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Pumpkin Pudding Parfait

If you’re feeling a little overwhelmed after planning a whole Thanksgiving meal, then this easy dessert will save you time and stress.

This pumpkin pie parfait has all of the flavor and nostalgia of a pumpkin pie with less fat and less time spent in the kitchen.

Kelly Hall, our Registered Dietitian, demonstrates how easy it is to put this dessert together.

Give yourself a break this year, and keep everyone happy with the pumpkin pie flavor they love.


  • 1 ounce fat-free sugar-free instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 2 cups skim milk
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree (or approx 1/2 of a 15oz can)
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 -2 cup Cool Whip Lite
  • 4 low-fat cinnamon graham crackers
  • 1/4 cup pecans


1. Prepare pudding according to package directions. Be sure to whisk for the full two minutes as the box instructs to ensure creamy texture.

2. Whisk in pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, and cinnamon.

3. Allow to set up in the refrigerator for at least 5 minutes (longer is better).

4. In small glasses or bowls, spoon in about 1/3 cup of pumpkin pudding, spreading with a spoon to create an even layer.

5. Next, add a layer of cool whip, followed by the last layer of pumpkin pudding.

6. Top with a dollop of cool whip and sprinkle with crushed graham crackers and pecans.

7. Enjoy immediately while graham crackers are still crunchy.


Find more healthy Thanksgiving recipes here.

Lucky’s Market 10% for Good Campaign

Lucky's Market. 10% for good. November 15th through Christmas.

Lucky’s Market will be donating 10% of the proceeds of its private label items to the St. Louis Area Foodbank

By purchasing Lucky’s Market black label items for your everyday grocery needs, you’ll be giving back to families in need in your community.

On Saturday, November 21, double your impact by stopping by the Lucky’s Market Rock Hill location. The Riverfront Times and the St. Louis Area Foodbank will be collecting canned goods for families in need.

We’ve created some recipes that include Lucky’s brand items to get you started. The recipe cards can be downloaded and printed for easy use. As an added bonus they also tell you how many meals you’re giving back to your community by purchasing the Lucky’s items listed!

Download recipe cards here

Lucky’s Market is located in Rock Hill and Ellisville, MO, and will run the 10% for Good campaign until Christmas.

Lucky’s Market Rock Hill
9530 Manchester Rd
St. Louis, MO 63119

Lucky’s Market Ellisville
15830 Fountain Plaza Drive
Ellisville, MO 63011


Ways to Get Involved this Autumn

 Giving back to your community can be a great way to spend time together and to help make someone else’s holiday a little brighter.

Autumn is a time to spend time with family and friends as we approach the holiday season. Some of our best memories of the past and plans for the future include a meal shared with loved ones. Autumn is also a great time of year to get involved through volunteering with loved ones.

Turkey Train 2012 045

The St. Louis Area Foodbank partners with over five hundred food pantries, soup kitchens and residential facilities in our region to distribute food to those in need. The opportunities to volunteer this season are abundant and appreciated.

Give Back in Your Neighborhood

One great way to give back is to volunteer at a pantry or soup kitchen in your area in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving and Christmas. During this time, much of the vital prep work is being put in to build holiday baskets, and facilitate the other holiday distributions that make this time of year so special for clients. In order to make access to these sites easy our website has a list of all partner agencies, which can be sorted by zip code. Those interested in volunteering in this way are welcome to reach out to agencies in their area in order to keep their impact close to home.

Find an agency near you.

Host a Holiday Food Drive

Holidays typically mean a lot of shopping for everyone. Start a collection of items to be donated. Get your whole family involved and tell your friends. Then, take your donation to your nearest food pantry or bring it to the St. Louis Area Foodbank. Taking the time to think of others can be as easy as picking up a few extra food items for those in need.

Check out the 35 Best Items to Donate. 


We are often amazed at the giving spirit we encounter at the St. Louis Area Foodbank, and are so proud to operate in such a gracious community. As the season gets colder and busier, consider donating your time to a local pantry or soup kitchen to add the warmth of volunteering to your holiday.

Share the Love


Like many holidays, Valentine’s Day changes meaning as we age.

In grade school, you probably exchanged candy with classmates. Maybe those little chalky hearts that say “Be Mine.”

Teachers probably encouraged you to design and color a card for your parents or grandparents.

Later in adolescence, you may have begun to question the validity of the holiday. Perhaps you even protested against celebrating it.

This rite of passage usually ends with a return to celebrating the holiday, particularly by the time you’re old enough to have a boyfriend or girlfriend.

The longevity of the holiday can be verified by the Greeting Card Association, who claims that 145 million greeting cards are bought for Valentine’s Day each year in the United States.

That means two cards are given to every five people in the United States!

No matter what your age, Valentine’s Day is about showing your love for someone else. Maybe you show your love with greeting cards, candies, flowers or dinners. Or maybe you even offer a “free” gesture of love like doing the dishes or giving a foot rub.

You can also show your love on Valentine’s Day by loving your community. Open your heart to those less fortunate, and please consider making a secure, online gift to the St. Louis Area Foodbank in honor of a loved one.

For the price of one $3 greeting card, we can provide 12 meals to your neighbors in need of a little extra love.

By Patrick Delhougne

Development associate at the St. Louis Area Foodbank.


Holidays on a Budget


Ah, the holidays.

They’re a time of gift-giving, parties and jubilant celebration.

Sadly, the winter holidays are also a time of elevated stress and budget-blowing overspending.

Even those who aren’t struggling financially may find it hard to come up with the extra money for holiday gifts, décor and food.

Here at the St. Louis Area Foodbank, we know just how hard it is for many of our clients to provide their loved ones with all the traditions of the holidays.

So, we’ve created a Pinterest board specifically dedicated to celebrating holidays on a budget. We’ve got:


• Inexpensive ideas for decorating, like bringing the outdoors inside or using wrapped gifts as décor.
• DIY tips for making homemade gifts, such as making ornaments with your child’s handprint or creating gift baskets!
• Ideas for fun and cheap holiday activities to do with the kids, like making cotton ball snowmen or reindeer cookies.
• Budget recipes for holiday meals, featuring shopping lists and cool ideas for cutting costs. (We have a whole board dedicated just to budget recipes!)

Click here to check out our Pinterest page and share some of your favorite holiday budget ideas with us in the comments!

By Bethany Prange

Communications coordinator at the St. Louis Area Foodbank

Tator Tots and Jon Stewart – Celebrating America When Times Are Tough


The American flag flies high above the Verizon Wireless Amphitheater / Photo by Bethany Prange

It has been a difficult few years.

Terms like layoff, poverty and hunger have become so familiar it’s hard to remember a time when the economy wasn’t troubled.

Current temperatures in the St. Louis region are hovering above 100 degrees as we approach the Fourth of July. The drought has caused many towns to cancel their annual fireworks display – and in some cases, their entire celebration.

These are reasons enough to feel a little less than enthusiastic about a mid-summer holiday.

But before you cancel your barbecue and climb under the covers to hibernate through this Independence Day, let’s take a moment to remember the things that make America so great.

• Americans are a generous lot.  We are a group of people who steps up to volunteer and donate to those less fortunate, even when we are struggling ourselves.  At the St. Louis Area Foodbank alone, more than 12,000 people volunteer here every year.  Despite their own circumstances, these individuals spend countless hours sorting and repacking food for families in need.

• Americans are clever folks. We’ve invented so many brilliant things – the Internet, toilet paper, the telephone, the artificial heart – we can forgive ourselves for reality television.

• Americans are free! Sure, we may not always like what our government does, but we live in a place where we’re free to shout about it from the rooftop. Better still, we can vote to change what we don’t like.

• Americans are resilient. As a country, we’ve faced adversity since we were born, but we just keep marching on. We’re a scrappy bunch and proud of it!

America put a man on the moon and brought the world iconic figures like Franklin Delano Roosevelt and classic designs like the 1966 Ford Mustang convertible.  From apple pie and baseball to Jon Stewart, we’ve got food, sports and entertainment in the bag.

And just in case you’re still not sure it’s great to be an American, CNN has a fun list of 100 things that make America great. Sure, they included Texas linedancing and the Dougie, but it’s still a fantastic list of unique things about this great country.

So as we approach Independence Day, let’s remember the awesomeness of being American. Even when things are tough, we still have tater tots and chocolate chip cookies!

Bethany Prange is the communications coordinator at the St. Louis Area Foodbank


Soldier of Good Fortune

John Richardson packs boxes in the St. Louis Area Foodbank Volunteer Center / Photo by Bethany Prange

Last Friday, many St. Louisans left work early or watched the clock, itching to start their Memorial Day weekends as soon as their feet hit the parking lot.

But here at the St. Louis Area Foodbank, one young man patiently loaded canned goods into boxes headed for families in need.  Dedicated to his task, he seemed almost unaware of the festivities of the impending holiday weekend.

Friday was John Richardson’s first time volunteering at the Foodbank. A job developer with Life Skills, Richardson started his holiday by mentoring a young client who was here to refine his skills.

Despite the gorgeous sunny day, Richardson enjoyed the opportunity to help others. To him, it was a perfect way to honor the true meaning of Memorial Day.

Just a year ago, Richardson was in Afghanistan, serving a 10-month tour with the Army. For this soldier and so many like him, Memorial Day holds a special significance.

    Bethany Prange is the communications coordinator at the St. Louis Area Foodbank